6 Reasons Google Apps Rock at School

In Livin’ la Vida Google: A Month-Long Dive Into Web-based Apps, Wired news editor Michael Calore describes his experiment to ditch desktop programs in favor of Google’s offerings.

I think there’s a huge application for students and teachers with online word processors (and so do many other educators). Here are my top reasons:

  1. Google Docs & Spreadsheets are my answer to “I left the file on my home computer” excuses.
  2. Students can easily work on a paper at school and at home without getting into email or USB drives to move stuff around. Students could even get at their paper while doing research at the library.
  3. Collaborative (but still private) work! Teachers could review drafts online or students could write a paper together.
  4. There’s a PDF output option.
  5. Version tracking. Google allows you to open prior versions of docs — handy when revising frequently and you zealously chop a necessary paragraph or two.
  6. It’s free.
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4 thoughts on “6 Reasons Google Apps Rock at School

  1. So are you doing it yet? At school? Anyone?

  2. Several of my students use Google Apps on their own. I haven’t started using it in any classes mostly because not everyone has a Google Account.

    Last week, though, a 10th grader came up to me after class to say the word processor “rocks” but that it doesn’t handle Open Office docs as well as he would have liked.

  3. I just came across your blog and I love it. I love the fact that you’ve written about Google Apps. I’m a technology coordinator for a small K12 in western New York State. I’m trying to get our administration to give us the go-ahead to sign up for Google Apps. I’m going to add you to my blog roll and I’m subscribing to your feed. I want to read more of what you’re doing with Linux too. I’m a Linux user myself and we’re using it i our school to some degree.

  4. Don — getting the go-ahead to sign up is where I’m feeling a new challenge. My users so far have been teens who already had Google accounts. As I push this stuff down to younger grades, I’ll have to deal with all the questions that come up with pre-teens using the web.

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